Transitional program for Occupational Therapy Assistants (TOTA)

Blended Program

Advance your Occupational Therapy Career

As an occupational therapy assistant, you know firsthand that you can make a difference in people’s lives. If you are highly motivated and able to work both independently and collaboratively, then Concordia University Wisconsin’s Transitional program for Occupational Therapy Assistants is a blended program that can help you enhance your professional skills and opportunities.

Program Benefits

  • Receive a Bachelor’s in Rehab Science (BSRS) in 2.5 years
  • Receive a Masters of Occupational Therapy (MOT) in an additional 1.5 years (includes fieldwork).
  • Receive a MOT degree in 2.5 years if you already hold a Bachelor degree
  • Learn new treatment methods that have immediate and direct application to current clinical work environments
  • Blended format provides students with on-campus, hands-on experience (26 weekends total) combined with flexible online coursework.

Transitional Program for Occupational Therapy Assistants

Course Number
Course Title
Description
Credits
OTA to BSRS
Required on-campus orientation.
OT 201Online Learning LabThis course provides an orientation to online learning and the Transitional Program for Occupational Therapy Assistants (TOTA). As a lab course the focus is on experiencing the skills needed for active participation in online courses. This lab is designed to orient the student pragmatically to Concordia University and the Occupational Therapy program while developing the skills needed to be successful with the CUW learning management software and other technology tools. Within the course students will establish initial contact with their advisers.3
RSC 310Culture in RehabThis course will introduce students to the issues of cultural diversity in today's health care arena. The importance of recognizing cultural differences, the role of culture in health care, negotiating cultural differences in working with clients, planning for evaluations, and designing therapeutic interventions will be explored. In addition, language as a cultural barrier, the impact of professional jargon cross-culturally, and standardized instruments and language issues will be investigated.3
RSC 304Teaching & Learning in RehabThis course will introduce students to various learning theories and teaching strategies as it relates to rehabilitation. This exploration will pay particular attention to the needs of an adult learner. Activities will help students appreciate how teaching is a part of working in a rehabilitation setting. Concepts of motivation in learning will be explored along with the impact of physical, cognitive, and psycho-social deficits in learning.2
HHP 375BiomechanicsThis course provides students with an understanding of mechanical principles such as force, inertia, momentum, and friction. Students will have the opportunity to apply these principles to various movement, rehabilitation and skill activities.3
LA 107Lib Arts for Health Care Prov.This course is designed to give students an overview of the Humanities and a basic definition of them. The course will help students to improve their critical thinking skills in the areas of literature, art, and music, and will suggest means of growth and application both professionally and personally.3
REL 100The BibleThis course is an overview of the Bible intended to acquaint the student with its background, content and messages. This introductory course satisfies the core curriculum requirements for Bible content for students who are not in a church work program.3
REL 110Christian TheologyThis course is an overview of Christian theology intended to acquaint the students with key theological concepts as they relate to every day life. This introductory course satisfies the core curriculum requirement for Christian doctrine for students who are not in church-work program.3
SW 392Aging in the Social EnvironmentThis course investigates the processes of human aging within the social environment . Social gerontology is concerned with the nonphysical aspects of aging. Particular emphasis is placed on its social, psychological, and spiritual aspects, although attention is given to the impact of aging on biological functioning. Group processes, ageism, and social forces that affect the aging process are examined.3
RSC 201Medical EthicsEthics and Rehabilitation is offered to provide students with the tools necessary to recognize and engage successfully the ethical challenges that arise in rehabilitation practice . Since today's medicine functions in a secular atmosphere, the student must be able to understand and converse with other health care professions concerning standard medical ethics concepts such as: autonomy, informed consent, patient confidentiality, life and death decision making, and professional responsibility. This course will also provide a brief overview of the most common ethical systems encountered in our pluralistic society in dialogue with Christian presuppositions and a Lutheran understanding of Law and Gospel. Case studies, course reading, lectures, and discussions will develop to articulate ethical challenges in rehabilitation and to make critical, informed, and God-pleasing ethical decisions.3
BIO 301Advanced Functional A&PThis course expands upon concepts introduced in Functional A&P I and II with emphasis on the structure and normal function of the organ systems and their common pathologies. Special emphasis will be placed on the muscular and nervous systems. The student will also be introduced to concepts of human movement, including anatomical terms or direction, fundamental planes and axes of movement, joint articulations and movements and the primary muscles that perform them.4
OT 106Medical TerminologiesThis course introduces a word-building system for medical terms through the use of a programmed text and facilitates appropriate pronunciation and use of the words derived from Greek and Latin components.1
OT 559WellnessThis course will focus on the application of occupational therapy theory and practice within a well population to prevent disability and enhance quality of life. Normal aging and the Well Elderly Study will be a focus of the course content, but also to include prevention in other contexts, such as prevention of injuries in the industrial environment, backpacks for kids, alcohol awareness for college age, or other issues of particular interest to the student. Unique contexts for occupational therapy will be explored such as providing OT in jails or prisons or in homeless shelters.3
BIO 550Human AnatomyThis course is an integrated approach to the gross anatomy of the human body, with particular emphasis on the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Consideration will also be given to the study of cells, tissues, and organ systems. The laboratory portion of the course consists of supervised dissection of human cadavers.6
OT 521OT FoundationsThis course is intended to ground the students in both theoretical concepts important to occupational therapy practice and practical knowledge about the profession. Theoretically, students will be introduced to those fundamental concepts discussed in the OT literature and declared as important threads in the CUW OT Program curriculum. These include: 1) philosophical assumptions about the nature and therapeutic value of occupation (occupation-centered practice); 2) the importance of the collaborative nature of the client-therapist relationship (client-centered practice); 3) the role of scientific research evidence in making clinical decisions (evidence-based practice); and 4) the importance of service in professional and personal activities. In addition, important events and trends in occupational therapy's history will be discussed. Moreover, the role of professional ethics is introduced. Practical issues related to the profession of occupational therapy are also introduced, these include: various arenas or contexts of practice; important documents in OT; OT organizations; supervisory relationships (i .e ., OTR-COTA); professional certification and licensure issues; and the importance of political involvement.3
OT 529Assessment SkillsThis course covers the beginning skill set of client-centered evaluation and use of the OT Process. Students will learn the basic process of performing evaluations, following a standardized format, and documenting results. Students will also learn to recognize influences on outcomes and how to compare client scores to normative data. This course will cover the skills needed to perform a number of basic evaluations, such as the manual muscle test, range of motion, and pinch/grip tests, in addition to the skills of observation, interviewing, and use of checklists and rating scales. Psychometric aspects of measurement tools (reliability, validity, etc.) will also be addressed.3
BIO 560NeuroscienceThis course covers basic principles of human nervous system structure and function. Subjects covered include spinal cord, brain stem, cranial nerves, cerebellum, thalamus, hypothalamus, the limbus system and the cerebral cortex. Topics such as emotion, language, memory, pain, conscience and consciousness will also be addressed. Neuroscience research will be discussed from a Christian perspective. The laboratory focuses on examination of human brains and small group analysis of patient case studies.3
OT 571Work Practice IThis course is designed to introduce students to issues related to work performance, including work conditioning, work hardening, functional evaluation, supported employment, job coaching, job analysis, and basic ergonomic principles.3
OT 563Pediatric Practice IThis course will lay the foundation for the study of Pediatric Occupational Therapy through exposure to a variety of major pediatric theories, disabilities and assessments. The developmental cycle from conception to adolescence will be reviewed, along with works of major pediatric theorists.3
OT 523KinesiologyThis course covers anatomical and mechanical principles of human movement and the application of these fundamentals to the analysis of motor skills. The lab will focus on the ability to integrate and practice the principles related to human movement. Motor control and exercise will also be addressed.3
OT 573Clinical Practicum - PediatricsThis practicum experience occurs simultaneous to the students' first Pediatric Practice course and is designed to provide the student opportunity to directly apply information learned in the Peds course. Students will be matched with a community fieldwork site where they will be able to initially observe, but by the end of the semester, apply observation and evaluation skills, treatment techniques and to practice documentation of interactions with the children. Students will be able to dialogue with their pediatrics professor regarding interactions with the children during the Pediatric Practice class.1
OT 586Rehab Science OrthopedicsThis course will provide students with a client-centered, evidence-based forum to learn more about the evaluation, theory, and treatment of individual's with physical disabilities. The ICIDH-2 will be used as a framework. Specific topics to be covered include: evaluation, treatment planning, and documentation for upper extremity orthopedic injuries (including but not limited to hands, elbows, shoulders), splinting, wound care, soft tissue mobilization, ultrasound, electramodalities and mechanical modalities. Safety, indications, precautions, and contraindications will be explained, identified, and applied.3
OT 544Clinical ConditionsThis course will utilize the ICIDH format of impairments of body structure and function: functional limitations and activity limitation and participation restriction, including a focus on common diagnoses related to neurological disorders, orthopedic disorders, autoimmune disorders, and cancers.3
OT 603Practice ManagementThis is a basic skills course focusing on skills all occupational therapy practitioners need to administratively function in typical health care environments. In addition, business development and management areas of study will be incorporated which will prepare students to assume more traditional management roles in a variety of models of service delivery. Students will be prepared to function in conjunction with other health professionals on the treatment team, to supervise OTA and support personnel, and to understand and realize the need for smooth organizational functioning to effectively conduct business as an occupational therapist.3
OT 540Scientific Inquiry IThis course is designed to help occupational therapy students acquire beginning level skills related to consuming and producing research. Fundamental scientific inquiry skills related to reading, understanding, and appraising the rehabilitation research literature for the purpose of evidence-based practice is emphasized. This course provides the student with critical reading and appraisal skills that will be used in clinical courses and fieldwork assignments. Students are also exposed to basic concepts of research methodology and a review of conceptually-based statistics that further enhances skills with consuming the scientific literature. The process of producing research is discussed, including topics of grant funding and research ethics, however, actual work on a research project is reserved for subsequent coursework in Scientific Inquiry II and Scientific Inquiry III . Students will practice reading and critiquing professional literature in the evidence-based practice project portion of the course. Students will also have the opportunity to research the scientific literature to appraise the evidence for a specific area of clinical practice related to occupational therapy. Students will receive feedback on their ability to write in a scholarly manner.3
OT 561Rehab Science -NeurorehabilitationThis is a professional skills course focusing on occupational therapy treatment of people with typical neurological conditions and diagnoses. Principles of Brunnstrom, Rood, PNF and Bobath will are examined. There is opportunity to compare and contrast evidence in the literature about motor learning theories, reflex-hierarchical and other approaches. Areas of sensation, perception, cognition and effects of traumatic brain injury and SCI are included. Students learn treatment techniques and handling practices in relation to how these are provided within a framework of occupation. Experiences on human volunteers are incorporated as possible to enhance the practical application of theories and skills learned in didactic coursework, and to emphasize learning about how to provide client-centered care with these populations. Documentation and treatment planning learning activities incorporate elements of activity analysis learned in previous semesters. Finally, when and in what contexts patients are seen is examined in this course.3
OT 584Clinical Practicum - Adult RehabThis course provides students with hands on experience in an adult physical disabilities clinical setting under the supervision of an occupational therapy fieldwork educator. Students will observe and practice in the clinical setting performance of assessments, guided interventions, and OT management processes.3
OT 569Scientific Inquiry IIThis 3 credit course is the second in the sequence of three courses designed to help students hone their critical inquiry skills. Students will continue to critically read and critique professional literature and determine its applicability to clinical practice. This course will cover advanced research design and methods for both quantitative and qualitative project. Students will practice statistical analyses using computer-based statistical packages. Whereas Scientific Inquiry I focuses on becoming a critical consumer of the scientific literature in rehabilitation, Scientific Inquiry II helps students develop beginning level skills as a producer of research in occupational therapy. Students will choose a project related to ongoing research of the professor and prepare a proposal for the Concordia University Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students will pilot test their methods and materials during this semester and begin construction of scientific poster for presentation of findings in Scientific Inquiry III next semester.3
OT 630Hands & UE RehabilitationThis course involves synthesizing previously learned scientific knowledge and applying the concepts to specific hand and upper extremity conditions. The focus will be on evaluation and treatment of typical upper extremity conditions that may be encountered by occupational therapists in a variety of practice settings. This course will also prepare the student for an adult outpatient fieldwork placement. Students will fabricate splints for a variety of upper extremity conditions.3
BSRS Awarded. Optionally Exit Program or Apply to MOT portion of program.
BSRS to MOT
OT 582Scientific Inquiry IIIThis course is the last in the sequence of three courses designed to help students become both critical readers (consumers) of the scientific literature in rehabilitation and beginning level producers. The primary focus of this course is implementation of the research skills learned in the previous two courses. Students will begin and/or complete data collection, enter collected data and run appropriate analyses on PC-based statistical packages. Students will write up results and discussion and present findings in scientific poster format to faculty and students at CUW and possibly state or national conference.3
OT 565Psychosocial Practice IThis course covers the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders, focusing on how these diagnoses affect functioning. Psychiatric disorders across the lifespan will be reviewed. Occupational therapy intervention will be explored using various occupational therapy theories/models and assessments. Documentation of occupational therapy intervention will also be included. Students will also learn the role of occupational therapy and the different contexts where individuals with a mental illness receive treatment. Other providers of psychiatric intervention and team members will be reviewed.3
OT 590Rehab Science IntegratedThis course will provide students with a client-centered, evidence-based forum to learn more about the evaluation, theory, and treatment of individual's with physical disabilities. The ICIDH-2 will be used as a framework. Specific topics to be covered include: theories of pain, biomechanical principles, principles of exercise, massage, myofascial release, craniosacral, ultrasound, electromodalities and mechanical modalities, sexual dysfunction, and emotional issues related to physical disabilities. Students will treatment plan and document for different contexts of service delivery within the arena of physical disabilities (home health, hospice, subacute, case management).3
OT 588Assistive Technology OptionsThis course examines the methods of integrating computers and related technologies, including the Internet and communication technology, into Occupational Therapy treatment. Class members will work hands on with a variety of equipment and software media to develop strategies for their use to enhance the treatment process. The course will explore an overview of assistive technology topics, basic computer system functions and problem solving techniques, software evaluation, and typical technology solutions for a variety of clinical diagnoses.3
OT 620Level II Fieldwork I3 months or 470 Hours - Students will complete two 3-month Level II fieldwork placements that will culminate the Masters of Occupational Therapy program of education. The Clinical Fieldwork Supervisor as well as the Academic Fieldwork Supervisor will monitor placements. Day-to-day clinical supervision will be the responsibility of the Clinical Supervisor, but the AFC will monitor that the fieldwork placement fits into the "big picture"of the students overall educational plan, and will monitor the placements that are "in process" by visiting the site during the midterm point of the 12-week placement when at all possible . The clinical setting may provide the student with a set of objectives that have been approved of by CUW, or the facility may choose to utilize the fieldwork objectives as outlined in the fieldwork syllabus.6
OT 605Community PracticeThis course will provide students with opportunities to investigate and experience current issues related to the practice of occupational therapy in community settings. The theoretical basis for community practice, performance of a needs assessment, literature review and justification, grant writing, legal liability, budgeting, and program planning for occupational therapy in a specific community setting or with a specific community topic will be explored.3
OT 601Advanced Clinical PracticeThe purpose of this course is to help students refine their working knowledge of occupational therapy theory. Students will explore various issues of importance to contemporary clinical practice. Students will apply concepts of theories, learned in prior coursework, along with current research results in a problem-based learning (PBL) case study format.3
OT 622Level II Fieldwork II3 months or 470 Hours - Students will complete two 3-month Level II fieldwork placements that will culminate the Masters of Occupational Therapy program of education. The Clinical Fieldwork Supervisor as well as the Academic Fieldwork Supervisor will monitor placements. Day-to-day clinical supervision will be the responsibility of the Clinical Supervisor, but the AFC will monitor that the fieldwork placement fits into the "big picture" of the students overall educational plan, and will monitor the placements that are "in process" by visiting the site during the midterm point of the 12-week placement when at all possible . The clinical setting may provide the student with a set of objectives that have been approved of by CUW, or the facility may choose to utilize the fieldwork objectives as outlined in the fieldwork syllabus.6
Electives
OT 562NeuroRehab IIThis is a professional skills course focusing on occupational therapy treatment of people with neurological conditions. Rehabilitation of the upper extremity, regaining function, further exploration of upper extremity mobilizations, and management including edema control will be addressed. Continuation of exploring vision, perception, and cognition as it relates to the neurologic client is examined in detail. Specifically, we will explore attention, orientation, memory, executive functions, visual processing skills, apraxia, body scheme disorders, visual discrimination skills, agnosia. Experiences on human volunteers are incorporated to enhance the practical application of theories and skills learned in didactic coursework, and to emphasize learning about how to provide client-centered care with these populations. Documentation and treatment planning learning activities incorporate elements of activity analysis learned in previous semesters.3
OT 613Work Practice IIThis course will provide students with opportunities to investigate and experience current issues related to the context of work, within the field of occupational safety and health, while focusing on an interdisciplinary, systems approach. Topics covered will include: the role of OT as private practice industrial consultant, advanced methods for evaluating manual work (i .e ., energy expenditure, biomechanical lifting analysis, etc) worker selection and training according to the ADA, OSHA mandates in industry, environmental analysis of the work-site, psycho-social issues and other topics pertinent to current practice.3
OT 615Early Inter/School PedsThis course will highlight aspects of working within early childhood and school based practice areas. The unique characteristics of an educational model (versus a medical model) will be explored.3
MOT Awarded